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Bread of Tears (by Lisle Gwynn Garrity)

Original Art

Purchase original art (physical products) by Lisle Gwynn Garrity, Sarah Are, Lauren Wright Pittman, and Hannah Garrity

Bread of Tears (by Lisle Gwynn Garrity)

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Bread of Tears (by Lisle Gwynn Garrity)

60.00

PHYSICAL PRODUCT

Lisle Gwynn Garrity
Bread of Tears
Acrylic paint & soft pastel on paper
9" x 13"

A meditation on the image of being fed the "bread of tears" in Psalm 80, this piece is a visual lament for all those who hunger for food and justice.

Unframed. Acrylic & soft pastel on basic watercolor paper. Image size: 7.5" x 11".

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From the artist:

"Sometimes the Psalms pierce us with their capacity to name the hurt we feel. We often turn away from lament Psalms because we don’t know what to do with them—they are so harsh and ragged at the edges. We want to tidy them up, make them glossy and hopeful and soft.

Psalm 80 cries out to God in anger, saying, “how long will you be angry with your people’s prayers?
You have fed them with the bread of tears.” I couldn’t stop thinking about the image of being fed bread of tears. I thought of Syrian children washed cold and lifeless along the shore of the refuge they couldn’t attain. I thought of Haitians eating cakes of mud to make their bellies feel full. I thought of Hispanic immigrants crossing the border, more willing to face death in the desert than a passive, desperate death back home.

Then I began furiously making marks with paint and pastel, the chaos of it all confusing and cathartic at the same time. After a while, I stepped back and immediately hated the piece. It made me uncomfortable to look at, these marks so crude and disorderly. Then I thought about the Psalms and decided that it’s exactly as it should be." —Lisle Gwynn Garrity,